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structures in europe and in the u.s. but there's another reason. the reason is, that has been said this morning, of course, economy is not always and only about data, but it's also about hegemony. it's a fight about ideas and the question is what kind of ideas? give you one little example. when we are talking about the europe crisis in europe, conservatives have reached one thing. the euro crisis on their view, and that is agreed on by many politicians and also by the public, the euro crisis is a crisis and has its reasons, in the public deficit. this is only one small part that they succeeded in bringing this view through, and it's also, that has consequences of course for economic policies. and, therefore, it's very important, and, of course, american economic debate has huge influence on european debates. it's very important that we are talking together, that we are working together and that we are trying to make a more differentiated approach on what and how to make policies engage the crisis. and that is, that is important because, and let me say that, because this room is ful
. lowering the direct cost of energy is key to helping the u.s. economy recover and prosper. absolutely key. next is clean. as we attempt to minimize indirect costs or the externalities by driving up these prices -- again, i would suggest that this is a policy that's doomed to economic and practical failure. instead, we have to be aware of the impacts of every type of energy and make rational, informed decisions on what is acceptable, what needs to be mitigated, how do we do just that. our challenge here is to reduce the cost of cleaner sources of energy, not raise the cost of existing sources. and when we talk about clean, what we've tried to do in this report is to give it some definition here. too often "clean" is treated as an absolute. but i would contend that it is better regarded as a comparison. a better definition of clean in my view and what we have used in this report is less intensive in global lifestyle impacts than its likeliest alternative. so just consider that. less global -- less intensive in global lifestyle impacts. so next, diversity. every type of energy clearly has it
as a u.s. senator from massachusetts. mr. president, i am proud to join my colleagues today in support of the violence against women act of 2013. i do so not just as a senator but as a mother of two daughters. this critical legislation has been held up for far too long, and it's past time for reauthorization. we have a serious responsibility to ensure that women and families are protected. the rates of violence and abuse in our country are astounding and totally unacceptable. according to a 2010c.d.c. study, domestic violence affects more than 12 million people each year. across the united states, 15 1/2 million children lives in homes in which domestic violence has occurred. and in my home state of north carolina alone, 73 women and children are killed on average every year because of domestic violence. let me say that number one more time. 73 women and children are killed every year due to domestic violence. these are alarming statistics, and we must act now to address them. since 1994, vawa programs, and in particular the stop program, that provides grants for services, training, of
, and under the current situation, these crimes are not deemed sufficiently serious for u.s. attorneys to typically prosecute these cases. they are serious cases. they deserve to be prosecuted, but only and consistently with the united states constitution. and if the tribal courts wish to assert jurisdiction over nontribe members, the only way they should be allowed to do so is if they incorporate the protections of the bill of rights. that is something that i have proposed to the distinguished chairman of the judiciary committee but which he has rejected. and we also have to have a means for an appeal to a federal court if a nontribe member is convicted in a tribal court. that is not in the underlying bill. so it just strikes me as somewhat bizarre to have a remedy which is in the form of my amendment which would confer on tribal courts the requirement that they incorporate the provisions of the bill of rights when a nontribe member is being tried in a tribal court and that a right to an appeal to a federal court also be included. that would remove the constitutional objection to the
've heard recently that among developed nations the u.s. has fallen to the bottom as far as longevity is concerned. yet we're paying a lot more than other people. wouldn't it save substantial medicare costs if we veered away from the pill for every ill, that mindset that we've kind of adopted in this country and embrace, look at other measures such as prevention, alternatives and educating people on things like genetically-modified foods and the long-term dangers they can present? >> i don't know who wants to take this. this is, i mean, questions often come up about improving coverage of prevention sort of over the course of a lifetime and in medicare. um, and there's been a lot of in that, and there have been a lot of improvements lately. one of the sort of unfortunate realities of living in this town and working with the congressional budge office as a score -- budget office as a scorekeeper is sometimes those initiatives, people believe they will save money, the cbo scores an increase in spending depending on the preventive service because they don't have a lifetime view, or they m
't want. >> i'm a student of the kennedy school. do you have any plans on expanding beyond u.s., for instance, to europe? [inaudible] hasn't been very successful expanding to many european countries. thank you. >> yeah. we're looking -- international coverage is really interesting. i think that we're trying every single print issue of the magazine at least a couple times a week to always have international content be in the mix. so we've had reported pieces from venezuela, or we had someone who was embedded in the afghanistan. we ran a piece in the last two issues ago on that. so it's really important. the question for us from just a business standpoint is, um, the economics of it. more often than not it works for us, it works best for us to work with freelance reporters or who are contributing for us and luke, who i just mentioned contributes for "the new york times" as well, and so we can get the content, we can get the ideas in the magazine we don't have, you know, a bureau in paris or kabul or something, something like that. so, but the international stuff, i think, is key
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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